Toggle Menu EF 157 - Honors Physics for Engineers I - Fall 2021 Syllabus

## Instructors ### Faculty - Dr. Nathan Hicks, nhicks7@utk.edu, 260D ZEC - Dr. Kevin Kit. kkit@utk.edu, 322 363B ZEC ### Graduate Teaching Assistants - Daniel Mountain, dmounta1@utk.edu - DeLaina McDonald, dmcdon13@utk.edu ## Schedule - Lecture: MWF 9:15 AM - 10:05 AM, 10:30 AM - 11:20 AM or 11:45 AM - 12:35 PM; ZEC 360 - Recitation: TR 9:50 AM - 11:05 AM, 11:30 AM - 12:45 PM, 1:10 PM - 2:25 PM, or 2:50 PM - 4:05 PM; ZEC 358 or 360 ## Website [https://efcms.engr.utk.edu/ef157-2021-08](https://efcms.engr.utk.edu/ef157-2021-08) - you must have consistent and reliable access to the web site. The web site contains a calendar of topics, instructor contacts, course policies, learning materials, assignments, and dates for exams. ## Materials - Access to the textbook (print or ebook) - *Physics for Scientists and Engineers*, 5th ed., Vol 1, by D.C. Giancoli, Pearson Prentice-Hall, 2021 - Laptop PC - A scientific calculator (cell phones and tablet-based calculators will not be allowed on exams) - Engineering paper for homework assignments - See here for more details ## Course Description EF 157 is an integrated, team-taught course based on the fundamental principle that the best way to learn how engineers approach physical phenomena is active involvement in solving real engineering problems. This course will emphasize consistent problem solving methods and skills appropriate for closed-ended problems, as well as design methods appropriate for open-ended problems. You will begin your study of fundamental engineering physics principles in this class. As engineers in industry depend on team problem solving and communication skills to effectively do their job, you will be placed in teams in order to work on projects. You will be given assistance in working in this format and be asked to practice oral and written communication skills. ## Catalog Description Honors version of EF 151 for well prepared students. Calculus based study of basic physics concepts including vectors, kinematics, Newton's laws, forces, work-energy, and impulse-momentum. Introduction to team work. Introduction to the engineering disciplines, examination of engineering principles and design issues; oral and written presentation skills. Corequisites:EF 105 or COSC 101 or COSC 102; and MATH 132 or MATH 141 or higher. ## Course Objectives Students will... - develop understanding of fundamental calculus-based physics principles useful for engineers - develop general strategies for solving engineering problems - learn and engage in the engineering design process - become familiar with the different engineering disciplines offered at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville ## Learning Goals Students will be able to... - apply mathematics, science, and engineering knowledge to hands-on situations, real-world settings, and creative design projects - utilize a structured, principled process to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems - design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data - design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints - employ effective written and oral communication of technical concepts - contribute effectively to an engineering team to complete investigative, creative, or practical work - discuss aspects and opportunities associated with different engineering disciplines ## General Education Natural Sciences Course Objectives As a course that fulfills the Natural Sciences (NS) requirement of the University of Tennessee's General Education Requirements, it will produce the following outcomes. 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to describe fundamental principles and chief discoveries through appropriate use of the basic vocabulary of a course’s discipline. 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the scientific dimensions of contemporary issues. 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to use experimental techniques to answer questions and test hypotheses. ## Grading
Category Weight
Module Exams, 4 @10% each 40%
Comprehensive Final Exam 15%
Learning Pages Completion 3%
Learning Questions 7%
Weekly Homework Sets 9%
Team Project 1 2%
Team Project 2 5%
Team Project 3 10%
Research Paper 4%
Recitation Participation 5%

- The course grading is A (>=90), A- (>=88), B+ (>=85), B (>=80), B- (>=78), C+ (>=75), C (>=70), C- (>=68), D+ (>=66), D (>=62), D- (>=60), F (<60), - All grades are rounded to 2 Significant Figures - 87.500 rounds to 88 - 87.499 rounds to 87 - Grade Boost: If your score on the final exam is higher than any in-class exam, that in-class exam will only count 8% and the final exam will count an additional 2%. This rule applies to all four in-class exams. - Example: Exam scores are 92, 78, 94, and 75. Score on final exam is 89. Exam scores of 92 and 94 would count 10%. Exam scores of 78 and 75 would count 8%. Final exam would count an additional 4%, or 19% overall. ## Due Dates ### Pre-Lecture Questions - online entry - available one week before class - 100% credit if completed by 8:00 am day of MWF class - 50% if late until 8:00 am day of module exam - 0% after ### Post-Lecture Questions - online entry - available 8:00 am day of class - 100% credit if completed by 8:00 am on day of **next** MWF class - 75% if up to 24 hr late - gradual decrease to 50% by 8:00 am day of module exam - 0% after ### Weekly Homework Sets - write our solution and upload scan as pdf - available Mon of that week - 100% credit if completed by 8:00 am Thur of following week - 90% if up to 24 hr late - 80% if up to 48 hr late - gradual decrease to 50% by that module exam - 0% after ## Help Hours There will be faculty office hours and regularly scheduled TA help hours. Schedules and details are available via the course website. ## COVID-19 Guidelines **With the spread of the Delta variant of COVID-19, students, faculty, and staff will be required to wear masks in classrooms, labs, and for indoor academic events required for students such as orientation. This requirement will remain in place until conditions improve and the university communicates new instructions.** The university strongly recommends that all members of the campus community be vaccinated for their own protection, to prevent disruption to the semester, and to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Vaccination information and appointment signups are available at [tiny.utk.edu/vaccine](https://tiny.utk.edu/vaccine). The Student Health Center medical staff is available to students to answer questions or discuss concerns about vaccines, and the center provides vaccines free of charge for anyone 18 years or older who would like one. If you think you are sick or have been exposed to COVID-19, you should contact the Student Health Center or your preferred health care provider. You can also contact the university’s COVID-19 support team for guidance by filling out the COVID-19 self-isolation form at [covidform.utk.edu](https://covidform.utk.edu). You must not attend class if you have tested positive for COVID-19 and are in the isolation period, if you have COVID-19 symptoms and have not been cleared by a medical provider, or if you are an unvaccinated close contact in the quarantine period. ## COVID-19 Related Absence **We will do our best to make accomodations for any student that is required to isolate due to COVID-19. However, in order to receive these accomodations you must do the following:** 1. Submit the University's [COVID-19 self-isolation form](https://covidform.utk.edu). This will trigger the Division of Student Success to contact Drs. Hicks and Kit. 1. Fill out the EF 157 [COVID-19 self-isolation form](https://forms.gle/SX7ggo1dHnqUwGgM7). Submission of the EF 157 isolation form will trigger notifactions to Drs. Hicks and Kit. We will contact students to begin making accomodations with the assumption that an email from Student Success is forthcoming. If this email is not received the accomodations will cease and a grade panalty may be assessed. You can find more information and updates at [utk.edu/coronavirus](https://utk.edu/coronavirus). ## Non-COVID-19 Absence We expect every student to attend class as much as possible. If you have to be absent from class due to illness or offical UT business (*e.g*., traveling with the Marching Band) contact Drs. Hicks and Kit at the earliest possible time. We will only grant excused absences for official UT business, illness, or extraordinary circumstances. ## Disability Statement Any student who feels they may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact [Student Disability Services (SDS)](https://sds.utk.edu) at 865-974-6087 in 100 Dunford Hall to document their eligibility for services. SDS will work with students and faculty to coordinate accommodations for students with documented disabilities. ## Academic Integrity Each student is responsible for his/her personal integrity in academic life and for adhering to UT’s Honor Statement. The Honor Statement reads: >An essential feature of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville is a commitment to maintaining an atmosphere of intellectual integrity and academic honesty. As a student of the university, I pledge that I will neither knowingly give nor receive any inappropriate assistance in academic work, thus affirming my own personal commitment to honor and integrity. We encourage students to work collaboratively to learn in our course. Appropriate means of collaboration may include meeting collectively to work on assignments. During collective meetings, all members are expected to participate in discussion and contribute to collective understand and dialogue. The following actions are specifically identified as inappropriate: - Direct copy (in part or in whole) of another class member's assignment or work to turn in as one's own work. - Direct copy (in part or in whole) of a solution provided by anyone outside of our class. This may include (but is not limited to) previous students, tutors, or solutions gathered from websites like Chegg. - Posting on a website, like Chegg, to ask for a solution to an assignment or exam in order copy the solution (in part or in whole) for submission. - Viewing solutions on a website, like Chegg, in order to submit solutions (in part or in whole) as one's own work for assignments or course exams. - Posting solutions or exam questions to social media, group chat, or other communication means to provide the questions or solutions for others in the course. - Collaboration in ANY WAY during a course exam. - Copying written work to submit as one's own work (in part or in whole) for written project reports. We take inappropriate or unethical work in this course VERY seriously. Inappropriate or unethical work is unfair to those students in the course who follow academic integrity guidelines. It also shows a lack of character in regards to future practice in the engineering profession. EF faculty and staff are dedicated to ensuring integrity of all work conducted throughout our courses and will pursue all means necessary, in partnership with the Tickle College of Engineering, the Dean of Students, and the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards to ensure an equitable learning environment. ## University Civility Statement Civility is genuine respect and regard for others: politeness, consideration, tact, good manners, graciousness, cordiality, affability, amiability and courteousness. Civility enhances academic freedom and integrity, and is a prerequisite to the free exchange of ideas and knowledge in the learning community. Our community consists of students, faculty, staff, alumni, and campus visitors. Community members affect each other’s well-being and have a shared interest in creating and sustaining an environment where all community members and their points of view are valued and respected. Affirming the value of each member of the university community, the campus asks that all its members adhere to the principles of civility and community adopted by the campus: [http://civility.utk.edu](http://civility.utk.edu). ## Digital Device Policy Technology can enhance classroom learning in many ways, but can also be a source of distraction for yourself or others in your class. We encourage the use of technology in the classroom as an aid to learning, and in fact will occasionally require the use of laptops during class. There are limits to what can be used in the classroom. The following guidelines should be followed: - You should not use a digital device that is a distraction to your learning. You are responsible for your learning. You may only use a device to aid in your learning. It is important that you practice self-regulation with your use of technology or digital devices in all learning settings. - You cannot use a digital device that is a distraction to another person's learning. You share your learning space with many others in our class. At no time should you use a device in a way that is distracting to others. This includes viewing content, sites, or social media that does not pertain to that day's work as well as any type of behavior that is inappropriate or harmful to others in the class. There is a zero tolerance policy in our course as well as at UTK for any behavior that can be interpreted as harrassment or bullying. - You cannot use a device with communication capability on an exam. For example, while phone, tablet or computer apps are acceptable for use during a regular class day, you cannot use a smartphone calculator app on an exam. You must use a calculator with no communication capabilities. - All other forms of digital device use are acceptable and encouraged in this course, both during class and lab. ## Course Material Copyright The instructors of this class own the copyright to the syllabus, handouts, assignments, quizzes, and exams associated with the class. All presentations developed by the instructors, as well as the instructors' lectures, are also protected by copyright, whether these presentations are delivered live in-class, shared through Zoom or other videoconference platforms, or uploaded to a web site. Sharing any of this material without the written permission of the instructor is a violation of copyright law, and is therefore also a violation of the University’s policy on acceptable use of information technology resources (UT policy number IT0110). That policy states that students will not commit copyright infringement, “including file sharing of video, audio, or data without permission from the copyright owner” and that file sharing is a violation of the university’s student code of conduct. All such violations will be reported to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards. ## Calendar Note, The following Calendar is our best estimate of the semester outline at the start of the semester, but it is subject to change. Always consult the website Calendar, Learning Pages, Recitations, and Team Projects on the left menu for the updated schedule.
MonTueWedThuFri
Aug
16

Aug
17

Aug
18
Lec 1.01
Course Intro
Aug
19
Lab 1.0
Course Logistics
Aug
20
Lec 1.02
Units, SF
Aug
23
Lec 1.03
Est, Stats
Aug
24
Lab 1.1
Estimation
Aug
25
Lec 1.04
Vectors
Aug
26
Proj 1.1
Assign Proj 1
Aug
27
Lec 1.05
Kinematics
Aug
30
Lec 1.06
Constant Acceleration
Aug
31
Lab 1.2
Kinematics
Sep
01
Lec 1.07
Projectile Motion I
Sep
02
Proj 1.2
Work
Sep
03
Lec 1.08
Projectile Motion II
Sep
06
Labor Day
Sep
07
Lab 1.3
Projectile Motion
Sep
08
Lec 1.09
Relative Motion
Sep
09
Proj 1.3
Proj 1 Due/Assign P2
Sep
10
Lec 1.10
Constrained Motion
Sep
13
Lec 1.11
Dept Info
Sep
14
Lab 1.4
Review Problems
Sep
15
Lec 1.12
Review
Sep
16
Exam 1
Sep
17
Lec 2.01
Newton's Laws
Sep
20
Lec 2.02
FBD = KD
Sep
21
Dept Fair
Sep
22
Lec 2.03
Friction
Sep
23
Proj 2.1
TBD
Sep
24
Lec 2.04
Friction and Motion
Sep
27
Lec 2.05
Cir Motion I
Sep
28
Lab 2.1
2nd Law
Sep
29
Lec 2.06
Cir Motion II
Sep
30
Fall Break
Oct
01
Fall Break
Oct
04
Lec 2.07
Drag
Oct
05
Proj 2.2
Proj 2 Due
Oct
06
Lec 2.08
Project 3 Intro + TBD
Oct
07
Lab 2.2
Review Problems
Oct
08
Lec 2.09
Review
Oct
11
Lec 3.01
Work
Oct
12
Exam 2
Oct
13
Lec 3.02
KE, Work-Energy
Oct
14
Proj 3.1
Project Work
Oct
15
Lec 3.03
PE, CoE
Oct
18
Lec 3.04
More CoE
Oct
19
Eng Day
No Class
Oct
20
Lec 3.05
More CoE, Power
Oct
21
Proj 3.2
Project Work
Oct
22
Lec 3.06
Linear Momentum
Oct
25
Lec 3.07
Collisions-Direct
Oct
26
Lab 3.1
TBD
Oct
27
Lec 3.08
Collisions-Oblique I
Oct
28
Proj 3.3
Project Work
Oct
29
Lec 3.09
Collisions-Oblique II
Nov
01
Lec 3.10
TBD
Nov
02
Lab 3.2
Review Problems
Nov
03
Lec 3.11
Review
Nov
04
Exam 3
Nov
05
Lec 4.01
Ang Kinematics
Nov
08
Lec 4.02
MMoI
Nov
09
Proj 3.4
Project Work
Nov
10
Lec 4.03
Torque
Nov
11
Lab 4.1
Torque Lab
Nov
12
Lec 4.04
Torque Problems
Nov
15
Lec 4.05
Ang Work-Energy
Nov
16
Proj 3.5
Proj 3 Test Day
Nov
17
Lec 4.06
Rolling
Nov
18
Lab 4.2
Review Problems
Nov
19
Lec 4.07
Ang Momentum
Nov
22
Lec 4.08
Review
Nov
23
Exam 4
Nov
24
Thanksgiving
No Class
Nov
25
Thanksgiving
No Class
Nov
26
Thanksgiving
No Class
Nov
29
Lec 5.01
TBD
Nov
30
Proj 3.6
Proj 3 Oral Reports
Dec
01
Lec 5.02
Semester Review
Dec
02
Study Day
Dec
03
Final Exam
3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
AMB 32
Dec
06
Final Exams
Dec
07
Final Exams
Dec
08
Final Exams
Dec
09
Final Exams
Dec
10